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Thread: Camshaft Sensor

  1. #11
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    Alright, I finally got the codes off my EEC. My connector was different from the three that were referenced in one of the web pages you mentioned, but I did a little guess and check work trying to figure out which terminals to jump on my EEC connector. I was actually able to use the flashing of my check engine light to get codes (my repair book told me about this technique).

    Okay, so here are the codes. I counted the codes about three times to make sure I had things right.

    Regular Fault Codes:

    335

    Diagnosed Circuit: Differential pressure feedback EGR sensor
    Condition: Sensor output less than or greater than expected during Key On Engine Off test


    539
    Diagnosed Circuit: A/C Switch
    Condition: A/C on during Key On Engine Off test


    565
    Diagnosed Circuit: Purge solenoid valve
    Condition: Open or short


    Continuous memory codes:

    214
    Diagnosed Circuit: Camshaft position sensor
    Condition: Open or short


    332
    Diagnosed Circuit: Differential Pressure Feedback EGR sensor
    Condition: Insufficient EGR flow


    I should add a couple notes:
    My engine thermostat stuck closed one time and overheated and temporarily seized my engine while it was idling to warm up in a parking lot at work. This happened a couple years ago, and after the time I first brought my truck in for a diagnostic. I don't know if that could explain any additional fault codes.

    Also, I had my A/C system recharged this past summer. Before that, I had problems with my A/C pump clutch going off at random intervals causing my engine to rev in strange bursts. That might explain the A/C fault code.

    So, with that known, any new light on the issue? You can see that the cam sensor code did indeed show up. Would a bad cam sensor cause the EGR flow to fault as well? I'm not sure what the EGR does, I assume something related to exhaust quality or something.

    My thought: Bad cam sensor trips EGR fault, which in turn gives me bad emissions to fail the I/M test. I dunno, someone help me here.

  2. #12
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    Yes! I finally found the b-ugger! It was in a well hidden, hard to reach spot right behind the Intake manifold just under the top of the firewall. Man, what an inconvenient spot to put it... I wonder if I might have to take my upper manifold off to get to it, sheesh. So, seems my repair manual was wrong, year 1994 does have one. Weird.

    I'm getting a replacement camshaft position sensor from NAPA. My version of the sensor is kind of hard to find, so they had to order it for me. Should be here in three days or so.

    Now my question is, how do I install this thing? My Chilton repair manual only gives me a description of how to install the two piece cam sensor (mine is the one piece unit where the sensor is integrated with shaft). My book basically ignores the existence of my version of the sensor.

    This is what my cam sensor looks like:



    The later models of Mazda b4000 pick-ups have cam sensors with a removable plastic cap that screws on with two screws like this:


    I wish mine had the plastic cap version... that one only costs $50 or so. My version that I got from NAPA was $370.

    With the plastic capped sensor, you're supposed to use some special syncro tool to synchronize the top of the sensor with the shaft. But my sensor is just one solid piece. I have no idea if my version of the sensor is just plug and play, or maybe there's some marking on the shaft that indicates correct positioning when I install it with my #1 cylinder at top dead center.

    Oh, and about the top dead center thing, how do I even do that? I can't see where my pistons are positioned inside the cylinder... how do I rotate my engine by hand, and how do I know where top dead center is?
    Last edited by duckshepherd; 03-31-2008 at 01:29 PM.

  3. #13
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    Alright, my new cam sensor has finally arrived. There is indeed a vane that I can see inside of it. There's a plastic window on it to see it. I took a picture so you can see:



    From this photo you can see part of the vane inside with a hint of orange painted on the corner of it. There are two marks on the window: a big one and a small one. I'm guessing the end of the vane with the orange mark lines up with one of the lines, but I'm not sure. The guy at NAPA tried looking through some of the repair manuals that NAPA has on its database, but no luck. Too bad this thing doesn't come with instructions

    So, anyone have any ideas on how to install this properly? What should line up with what? Would the engine be at TDC or some angle past that when installing it?

    Where is the vane positioned on the other versions of this sensor when the engine is at top dead center?

  4. #14
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    This is all I came up with...
    1994 B Series Pick-up Equipped With the 3.0L Engine and All 1996–98 MPV Models

    Refer to Section 2 in this manual for distributor removal and installation.

    1995–98 3.0L and 4.0L Engines

    NOTE: If the camshaft position sensor housing does not contain a plastic locator cover tool, a special service tool such as T89P-12200-A, or equivalent, must be obtained prior to installation. Failure to follow this procedure may result in improper stator alignment. This will result in the fuel system being out of time with the engine, possibly causing engine damage.
    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
    2. Remove the ignition coil, radio capacitor and ignition coil bracket.
    3. Disengage the wiring harness connector from the CMP sensor.
      NOTE: Prior to removing the camshaft position sensor, set the No. 1 cylinder to 10°After Top Dead Center (ATDC) of the compression stroke. Note the position of the sensor electrical connection. When installing the sensor, the connection must be in the exact same position.
    4. Position the No. 1 cylinder at 10°ATDC, then matchmark the CMP sensor terminal connector position with the engine assembly.
    5. Remove the camshaft position sensor retaining screws and sensor.
    6. Remove the retaining bolt and hold-down clamp.
      NOTE: The oil pump intermediate shaft should be removed with the camshaft sensor housing.
    7. Remove the CMP sensor housing from the front engine cover.
    Fig. 1: Exploded view of the Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor mounting for the 3.0L engine — 4.0L engine is similar






    8. To install:
    If the plastic locator cover is not attached to the replacement camshaft position sensor, attach a synchro positioning tool, such as Ford Tool T89P-12200-A or equivalent. To do so, perform the following:
    A. Engage the sensor housing vane into the radial slot of the tool.
    B. Rotate the tool on the camshaft sensor housing until the tool boss engages the notch in the sensor housing.

    NOTE: The cover tool should be square and in contact with the entire top surface of the camshaft position sensor housing



    9. Transfer the oil pump intermediate shaft from the old camshaft position sensor housing to the replacement sensor housing.

    10. Install the camshaft sensor housing so that the drive gear engagement
    occurs when the arrow on the locator tool is pointed approximately 30°counterclockwise
    (the sensor terminal connector should be aligned with its matchmarks)
    from the face of the cylinder block.

    11. Install the hold-down clamp and bolt, then tighten the bolt to 15–22 ft. lbs. (20–30 Nm).
    12. Remove the synchro positioning tool.
    CAUTION
    If the sensor connector is positioned correctly, DO NOT reposition the connector by rotating the sensor housing.
    This will result in the fuel system being out of time with the engine. This could possibly cause engine damage.
    Remove the sensor housing and repeat the installation procedure beginning with step one.


    13. Install the sensor and retaining screws, tighten the screws to 22–31 inch lbs. (2–4 Nm).
    14. Attach the engine control sensor wiring connector to the sensor.
    15. Install the ignition coil bracket, radio ignition capacitor and ignition coil.
    16. Connect the negative battery cable.

  5. #15
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    94 Mazda B4000 Code Read 3 Ways

    No other good place to post, might be useful:
    Applies to 1994 year model

    Reading Codes

    NAVAJO & 1994 B SERIES PICK-UP MODELS

    Scan Tool Method
    1. Connect the scan tool to the self-test connectors. Make certain the test button is unlatched or up.
    2. Start the engine and run it until normal operating temperature is reached.
    3. Turn the engine OFF and wait 10 seconds.
    4. Activate the test button on the STAR tester.
    5. Turn the ignition switch ON but do not start the engine.
    6. The codes will be transmitted. Six to nine seconds after the last code, a single separator pulse will be transmitted. Six to nine seconds after this pulse, the codes from the Continuous Memory will be transmitted.
    7. Record all service codes displayed. Do not depress the throttle during the test.
    8. After the test, compare the DTC's retrieved with the accompanying DTC identification charts.
    Analog Voltmeter Method


    In the absence of a scan tool, an analog voltmeter may be used to retrieve stored fault codes. Set the meter range to read DC 0–15 volts. Connect the positive lead of the meter to the battery positive terminal and connect the negative lead of the meter to the Self-Test Output (STO) pin of the diagnostic connector.
    Follow the directions given previously for performing the scan tool procedure. To activate the procedure, use a jumper wire to connect the signal return pin on the diagnostic connector to the self-test input connector. The self-test input line is the separate wire and connector with or near the diagnostic connector.
    The codes will be transmitted as groups of needle sweeps. This method may be used to read either 2 or 3 digit codes. The Continuous Memory codes are separated from the other codes by 6 seconds, a single sweep and another 6 second delay.
    1. After the test, compare the DTC's retrieved with the accompanying DTC identification charts.
    Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Method


    The Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) on the dashboard may also be used to retrieve the stored codes. This method displays only the stored codes and does not allow any system investigation. It should only be used in field conditions where a quick check of stored codes is needed.
    Follow the directions given previously for performing the scan tool procedure. To activate the tests, use a jumper wire to connect the signal return pin on the diagnostic connector to the Self-Test Input (STO) connector. The self-test input line is the separate wire and connector with or near the diagnostic connector. Codes are transmitted by place value with a pause between the digits; Code 32 would be sent as 3 flashes, a pause and 2 flashes. A slightly longer pause divides codes from each other. Be ready to count and record codes; the only way to repeat a code is to recycle the system. This method may be used to read either 2 or 3 digit codes. The Continuous Memory codes are separated from the other codes by 6 seconds, a single flash and another 6 second delay

    Diagnostic Connector


    To read Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's), the test connector for the electronic engine control system must be used. The Data Link Connector (DLC) is also sometimes known as the Assembly Line Diagnostic Link (ALDL) connector. On 1994–95 vehicles, the DLC is located under the hood near the power distribution box. On 1996–98 vehicles, the DLC is located in the passenger compartment, under the driver side dashboard.
    The connector is trapezoidal in shape and can accommodate up to 16 terminals.

    Last edited by crabtruck; 04-03-2008 at 07:16 PM.

  6. #16
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    Thanks for your help crabtruck. But it seems I'm at a loss for finding info for installation of my particular sensor. So, here's what I plan to do:

    Now that I know there is some kind of viewing window on the cam sensor, I know that I can at least tell the position of the vane that spins around inside the sensor. So I plan to put my engine at top dead center (TDC), then look at the vane position in the old sensor, and copy that position when I install the new sensor. Sounds simple enough, right? Well, there is a catch: the cam sensor is tucked just under the upper intake manifold way on the back part of the engine, right under the firewall. I can't even see the darn sensor's window without taking the upper intake manifold off. Looks like I've got a fun repair ahead of me.

    I plan on taking photos and documenting my finding in the replacement of the sensor then posting them in this forum. Hopefully I'll alleviate some poor soul's confusion who's stuck with the same dilemma in the future.

    I'm holding off on doing repairs 'til the end of the month, when I have access to my uncle's garage. Next time you hear from me, I'll be back with answers instead of questions!

    Thanks for all the help!

  7. #17
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    A man, a plan, a garage. You're all set to go at it ! Looking foward to the update next month.

  8. #18
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    Thumbs up Haynes Manual is a Life Saver

    You won't believe this.

    I decided to purchase a Haynes Manual in hopes that it might explain something about my camshaft sensor, and voila! Indeed it does!

    The Haynes manual I purchased covers Ford Rangers Pick-ups from 1993-2005 and Mazda B2300, B2500, B3000, and B4000 trucks from 1994-2005. I figured, since my truck is basically a ford ranger, this guide would be more helpful and specific to my repairs. The Chilton manual I have covers Navajo and MPV models plus B-series trucks, which distracts from the details of repair for my particular vehicle's make and model.

    So, here is the procedure, as outlined in my Haynes Manual:






    So, forget taking the intake manifold off. Seems that I can get the vane in the general position by lining the end of it with the shorter mark on the window, stick the sensor in at TDC, then use an ohm meter on the specified terminals on the sensor to get the synchronization just perfect. No guessing here!

    Hope that helps anyone with the same problem!

    This Haynes manual is so much better at explaining things than my Chilton, too. I don't think I'll ever go Chilton again.

  9. #19
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    emission problem

    I recently replaced the motor in my 1998 Mazda B3000. I found an engine from a 2000 ford ranger with low miles and well taken care of from a friend. My mechanic told me it would work, all he had to do was swap the wires from engine. I am experiencing some serious emmisson problem. Truck throwing out black smoke and burning way too much fuel. Took it to auto store and they said it was MAF(mass air flow sensor) replaced it but still doing same thing. Took it back now saying manufactor control air meter. Do anyone knows what that mean or could tell me what my problem could be.

  10. #20
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    camshaft sensor B4000 Mazda

    Installed a new camshaft sensor just like duckshepherd did. Had a very difficult time getting the old one out. I had to take a 2x4 across the engine bay, two runs of tie wire wrapped around the sensor tied over the board, then pried up on it to get it to pop out. I thought maybe it had to be at TDC or something, but that was not the case, it was just stubborn coming out.

    It was difficult to get it all the way back in too. Tight tolerances I guess. But just like the Hayes manual says, rotate it until voltage reads, tighten it down. Cleared my 214 CID sensor code fault.

    Now we will see if it passes smog

    Wanted to say thanks to duckshepherd and the forum for the post, lead me in the right direction.

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