1996 Chevy K1500 Rear Axle - weight carrying capacity ?

Discussion in 'Chevy Truck Forum' started by Capn Bob, May 31, 2009.

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  1. hotrodpc

    hotrodpc Senior Member

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    I would tend to lean more toward the RPO code in the glove box being correct. If the owners manual is SUGGESTING at gear ratio, that is probably the standard gear ratio, but there are several others available. In a 1500 I much doubt its the full float rear. This 14 bolt that I got recently is a semi float and has 4.10's. You may also look for a G80 RPO code in the glove box too. If it has the G80, and is still original, then its locking differential. Not one of the better ones, It will be the Eaton Gov Lock.
     
  2. Capn Bob

    Capn Bob Full Member

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    Hi Hotrodpc!
    The RPO code in the glove box does not have a G80 code indicated. All I can say right now is that it has plenty of power and handles a heavy load pretty well for a K1500. The glove box has a code of GT4, indicating 3.73 gear ratio.
     
  3. hotrodpc

    hotrodpc Senior Member

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    If that the case, then its an open differential. If keeping it stock and you need a CHEAP locker, get a Lock Right. I hear they are good for up to 350hp and medium duty stuff. If you want to go hi po and doing some rough stuff, then get a Detroit locker, about the best money can buy in most opinions. I am a bit jealous though. I like that 3.73 ratio. Not so high, not to low. I have a 4.10 and a 3.21. Both ends of spectrum, but nothing in between which is where I'd like to be. The 4.10 will be OK if I get an OD trans with it, so rather then spend money on a gear change, I think I'd be better off spending the funds on a used 700r4 and building it myself. I happen to be buying 3 transmissions this week, all are cores, a T350, 700r4 and a 4L60-E. Getting all for $75 ($25ea) so that ought to get me in biz where I want to be using the 700r4.
     
  4. Capn Bob

    Capn Bob Full Member

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    Axle ID Location

    Where exactly are the identification markings located on a 96 Chevy, 14 bolt axle?
    Thanks,
    Capn Bob
     
  5. leolkfrm

    leolkfrm Full Member

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    on a tag under a bolt
     
  6. Capn Bob

    Capn Bob Full Member

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    Thanks for all the replies, but I’m still not sure what I have for a rear differential. Maybe I should’nt worry about it, but I’m carrying a slide-in camper that weighs a little over 3000 Lbs. It seems to handle the load fine with the suspension add-ons. I am just curious what the manufacturer of the axel rates it at as far as load bearing. I’m hoping that you more knowledgeable can answer my

    1996 Chevy K1500 4X4 Short Box, 5.7 Liter VORTEC engine with automatic transmission (4l60e – RPO code M30), Firestone Ride-Rite Air Bags, KYB MonoMax Shocks, Torklift Stable Loads, and “E” rated tires. The RPO code (GT4) says that the axle ratio is 3.73, with diamond shaped, 14 bolt differential cover. I’m pretty sure that the differential is the “semi-floating” type. Marks cast into front lower side of differential case are as follows:

    Front Left – A wagon wheel shaped symbol followed by CFD (or O, I can’t quite tell), and below that is 9690N

    Front Right – GM7

    VIN NO: 2GCEK19R2T1135464


    Thanks,
    Capn Bob
     
  7. Capn Bob

    Capn Bob Full Member

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    96 Chevy K1500 Rear Axle, again.

    I’m still not sure what I have for a rear differential. Maybe I should’nt worry about it, but I’m carrying a slide-in camper that weighs a little over 3000 Lbs. It seems to handle the load fine with the suspension add-ons. I am just curious what the manufacturer of the axel rates it at as far as load bearing. I’m hoping that you more knowledgeable can answer my

    1996 Chevy K1500 4X4 Short Box, 5.7 Liter VORTEC engine with automatic transmission (4l60e – RPO code M30), Firestone Ride-Rite Air Bags, KYB MonoMax Shocks, Torklift Stable Loads, and “E” rated tires. The RPO code (GT4) says that the axle ratio is 3.73, with diamond shaped, 14 bolt differential cover. I’m pretty sure that the differential is the “semi-floating” type. Marks cast into front lower side of differential case are as follows:

    Front Left – A wagon wheel shaped symbol followed by CFD (or O, I can’t quite tell), and below that is 9690N

    Front Right – GM7

    VIN NO: 2GCEK19R2T1135464


    Thanks,
    Capn Bob
     
  8. leolkfrm

    leolkfrm Full Member

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    According to the OEM specs you are overloading the axle


    Dimensions & Capacity
    DetailsFuel Capacity 25.0 Wheel Base 117.5 inches Overall Length 194.5 inches Width 76.8 inches Height 70.4 inches Curb Weight 3775 lbs. Tires / Wheel Size P235/75R15 Rear Tires / Wheel Size - Turning Radius 39.8 Standard Axle Ratio 3.08 Maximum Ground Clearance 7.0 Maximum GVWR 6100 Maximum Towing 7500 Payload Base Capacity 2069 Head Room: Front 39.9 inches Head Room: Rear - Leg Room: Front 41.7 inches Leg Room: Rear - Shoulder Rm: Front 65.4 inches Shoulder Rm: Rear - EPA Passenger - EPA Trunk or Cargo - EPA Total Interior - Truck Bed Volume -
     
  9. Capn Bob

    Capn Bob Full Member

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    Hi leolkfrm, thanks for the reply.
     
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